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Amazingly Easy Honey Butter Biscuits

This recipe for honey butter biscuits is unbelievably delicious. Even if you’ve never made homemade biscuits before this recipe will turn out great!

What I love about these Honey Butter Biscuits

There’s a reason these are called “Amazingly Easy.” This truly is an amazingly easy biscuit recipe. There’s no need for the usual techniques like cold butter cut in with a pastry cutter or frozen butter grated on a box grater and tossed with flour.

This brilliant trick of stirring melted butter into cold buttermilk creates the pockets of butter in the biscuit dough that yield the absolutely perfect texture you want in flaky biscuits. And by using buttermilk, they have that delicious buttermilk flavor that reminds you of your grandma’s biscuits (or at least it reminds me of mine!)

amazingly easy honey butter biscuits

Frequently Asked Questions about this Amazingly Easy Honey Butter Biscuit Recipe

If I don’t have buttermilk, can I substitute regular milk?

To make your own buttermilk, combine 1 cup whole milk with 1 tablespoon white vinegar. I tend to think the flavor of real buttermilk is still a cut above this substitution, but it will work in a pinch. 

Can I use unsalted butter in place of the salted butter?

Yes. You might try adding just the slightest little bit of kosher salt to your buttermilk mixture to ensure the taste is the same. But be careful not to over-salt your biscuits. Salted butter isn’t terribly salty. 

Can I make the dough with a hand mixer?

No, please don’t. For best results, you should avoid overmixing biscuit dough. This ensures you get tender biscuits.

If I can’t find self-rising flour, what should I use?

You can easily make your own self-rising flour by whisking together 1 cup of all-purpose flour, 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder, and 1/4 teaspoon salt for every 1 cup of self-rising flour needed. (Note some people call this “self-raising flour”.)

I don’t have shortening or peanut oil. Can I use butter to melt in the skillet?

You can, but it wouldn’t be my first choice. I would suggest another high-heat oil, like avocado or soybean oil. The cast-iron skillet gets very hot, and you want to be sure that the milk solids don’t burn if you’re using butter in the skillet.

If I don’t have a cast-iron skillet, what do you recommend?

As a southern gal, I love the crispy bottom of a buttermilk biscuit cooked in a cast-iron skillet. But I realize not everyone has one in their kitchen. (I do recommend you get one, though. Here’s one in my Amazon affiliate store that I recommend.)

As an alternative, you could line a baking sheet with parchment paper, arrange biscuits on prepared baking sheet, and cook as directed. Skip, of course, the step of melting shortening in the skillet. 

If I don’t have a biscuit cutter, can I make these as a drop biscuit recipe?

I haven’t tested the recipe that way, but I’m fairly certain they would work. I tend to prefer drop biscuit batter on the wetter side. So don’t add any additional flour when stirring the dough together. 

amazingly easy honey butter biscuits
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Homemade Honey Butter Biscuits

Amazingly Easy Honey Butter Biscuits


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5 from 2 reviews

  • Author: Regan at This Baking Life

Description

This truly easy biscuit recipe is unbelievably delicious. Even if you’ve never made homemade biscuits before this recipe will turn out great!


Ingredients

  • 2 Tbsp. shortening or peanut oil
  • 1 cup cold buttermilk
  • 1/2 cup salted butter, melted
  • 1 Tbsp. honey
  • 2 cups self-rising flour, plus more for work surface
  • 2 Tbsp. honey butter (homemade or storebought, such as Land O’Lakes), melted

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F with oven rack in middle position. Add shortening to a cast-iron skillet; place in hot oven to melt.
  2. Meanwhile, place buttermilk in a small bowl. Add melted butter to buttermilk, stirring with a fork until butter forms small clumps; stir in honey.
  3. Place flour in a large bowl. Add buttermilk mixture, and stir with a rubber spatula or wooden spoon just until combined. Dough should be firm, but not too wet. (If dough is very wet, add more flour, 1 tablespoon at a time, stirring to combine, until dough is firm.)
  4. Turn biscuit dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Dust top of dough with flour, and knead just until smooth, about 30 seconds. Pat into a 1-inch thick rectangle. Using a round biscuit cutter, cut out biscuits. Knead any dough scraps, and cut into biscuits.
  5. Remove hot skillet from oven, and set aside. Arrange biscuits in skillet.
  6. Bake in preheated oven until top of the biscuits are golden brown, 15 to 20 minutes.
  7. Remove baked biscuits from oven. Brush tops of the biscuits with melted honey butter to make a honey butter glaze. Place under broiler to brown tops, as desired. Serve warm. Store leftover biscuits in an airtight container.

Notes

Recipe adapted from Cooks Illustrated via Serious Eats

Other delicious easy baking recipes for breakfast:

easy overnight baked french toast cups

Make-Ahead French Toast Cups

Easy Cinnamon Twist Bread

Easy Cinnamon Twist Bread

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3 Comments

  1. Not having to grate the butter saves time! (Who remembers the night before to freeze butter anyway?) I
    forgot to put peanut oil into skillet until after it came out of the oven and it worked fine anyway. Easy and delicious recipe and the biscuits are much prettier than drop biscuits.






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